LinkedInChat and the Social Media Facebook Chat: YOU be the LinkedInExpert

By: Viveka Monday July 4, 2011 comments Tags: Social Media, LinkedIn, LinkedInExpert, LinkedIn Expert, Social Media Speaker, LinkedIn Tips, Viveka von Rosen, LinkedIn Advice, Andrea Vahl, @SMExaminer, @AndreaVahl

Social Media Examiner Chat:


On Friday July 1st, Andrea Vahl of the Social Media Examiner asked me to do a stint as their “LinkedIn Expert” on their now famous Facebook Chat.  (If you have not yet attended one of these – I highly recommend them!  They take place every Friday at 1 PM EST.)

Since not all my LinkedIn Experts out there – I decided to bring the questions to the  #LinkedInChat so that YOU all could answer.

So on Tuesday July 5th , Tuesday July 12th and Tuesday July 19th - I will be posting the same questions for YOU to answer that  I answered on www.facebook.com/SMExaminer on Friday.  And for those reading this blog who don’t do Tweetchats and just want a transcript – I have the questions and answers posted below.

Tweetchat:


We hold out tweetchat every Tuesday night at 5 PM PST / 8 PM EST.  I usually hang out at www.tweetchat.com/linkedinchat - but you can use whichever tweetchat tool you most enjoy!

Here are the questions for Tuesday nights (So you can do the homework and be well prepared!)

Questions for Tuesday July 5th:


Q1:  How do I to build connections with people I don’t know on LI without coming off as some kind of creep?

Q2. Do 
you know of any surveys that include information on LinkedIn use by 
nonprofits

Q2.b. Can you point me to any nonprofits who are using LinkedIn
 creatively?

Q3.  How do you recommend marketing your brand or service without seeming like spam?

Q4: How to utilize/build engagement with a LI profile?

Q4.b  Is there any way I can build interaction with my target market?

Q5:  How can LinkedIn be used for Non-Profits that need to recruit donors/sponsors and gain funding?

Questions for Tuesday July 12th:


Q6: How can you link your tweets to post directly in your group or company page, so all your members can see them?

Q7.  What are some ways businesses can use linked ads to target for B2B?

Q8.  I cannot seem to get my head wrapped around how to use LI to promote our business to a geographically targeted market.

Q8b:  Is it worth it to upgrade from free to fee?

Questions for Tuesday July 19th:


Q8c: What are the real benefits?

Q9.  How do you get through the noise to make LinkedIn more valuable

Q10.  My company is very ROI oriented.  What do you recommend in terms of metrics and analytics?

Q11.  What are some of the best new applications integrating social media with other tools?

Q12. Would you share of few links or reference lists for "making the most of LinkedIn"?

Q13.  How often do recommending posting/ updating content on your linked in page?

Q14.  What are the most important not to be missed sections that MUST be used in your personal LI page and also for a company page.

 

Social Media Examiner Questions and Answers:


Q1:  I am into Social Media Marketing and want to know how to build connections with likeminded people as well as SM experts on LinkedIn. But I am obviously unknown to them. So how can I build connections on LinkedIn without coming off as some kind of creep??


Great question – I know LinkedIn says you should only connect to people you know, but I have found most folks will either accept or ignore (but not report you as a spammer) if you personalize your invitation and tell them why you want to connect.  You can always wrote something like this:

Dear (Name)


I see from your profile that you… Can I connect to you as a thought leader in that field?  If you feel you have received this invitation in error or simply don’t want to connect, please just ignore this message.


The best way to connect to them is through a group – or sometimes people have their email addresses in their profiles.  Never choose “I don’t know” a person. (LinkedIn will ding you for it).  If you do reach out to someone as a colleague, classmate, etc – just make sure you acknowledge that you know you are not..

Q2.  It appears that most nonprofits engaged in social media efforts take
 advantage of Facebook and Twitter way more than they do LinkedIn. Do 
you know of any surveys that include information on LinkedIn use by 
nonprofits (how that compares to FB and TW and/or how they are using it in its own right)? Can you point me to any nonprofits who are using LinkedIn
 creatively?


Excellent question – and I’m afraid I don’t really have a great answer for you since that is not my focus market.

Q3.  How do you recommend marketing your brand or service without seeming like spam?



  • Keyword your personal and business profile so people can find you – then its inbound and not annoying

  • Make sure you update with useful info – and keyword brand your posts – same as above

  • Join groups where your ideal clients hang out – again just sharing useful info so they respond to you.

  • Post and Answer questions in your industry – but don’t create a salesy and obvious question just so you can answer it yourself

  • Re-purpose marketing content using some apps (Box.net, Slideshare, Google Docs)

  • Carefully reach out to ideal clients – but just to get the phone call – NOT to pitch your product

  • Create a company template so everything is saying the same thing about your company in their profiles – that should get you started J

  • More here: http://linkedintobusiness.com/2010/10/b2b-best-practices-for-getting-found-on-linkedin/


Q4: How to utilize build engagement with Linkedin profile? Is there any way I can build interaction with my target market?



  1. Use the advanced search to find ideal client

  2. See if you share a group – if not you might join one that they’re a member of

  3. Initiate communication with them through the group (something in common)

  4. Ask them for a phone call once you’ve had a little interaction

  5. Ask them to connect


Q5:  How can LinkedIn be used for Non-profits that need to recruit donors/sponsors and gain funding?


Again – this is not my area of expertise – But I think engaging within shared groups might be your best bet.  Once you are connected to some ideal donors you can “tag” those connections and send them valuable and useful information they will find useful – NOT a sales call.  More here: http://linkedintobusiness.com/2011/01/tagging-your-way-into-toma-with-linkedin/

Q6:  How can you link your tweets to post directly in your group or company page, so all your members can see them? Right now they only post to your profile.


I really DON’T recommend that at all!  It’s annoying enough in a personal profile.  If you own the group you can post feeds – so you could create a feed with your tweetstream and import it that way.  But again I REALLY DON’T RECOMMEND IT.  Twitter and LinkedIn are a completely different culture.

You might try some tools like ObjectiveMarketer – it might work.  Not sure.

Q7.  What are some ways businesses can use linked ads to target for B2B?



  • Before you invest in LinkedInAds (and "Google" for free trial - there are a bunch of $100 certificates floating around) First use the new targeted (and free) banner ads in Company profiles - lets you create and target specific audiences with your company profile

  • Also - connect with @MilesAustin on Twitter - he knows a lot about this

  • Finally - use the LinkedIn option to create and test different ads. really, what works for Facebook Ads or PPT will work with LinkedIn - just be very very clear on your target audience.

  • Word of warning:   The only people I've heard that find LinkedIn Ads really work ore the folks who invest A LOT in them.


Q8:  I'm new to LinkedIn and just can not seem to get my head wrapped around how to use this to promote our business to a geographically targeted market.

Q8. A: Is it worth it to upgrade from free to fee? What are the real benefits?


Great question - I didn’t use to think so – but my mind has changed a bit since LinkedIn is further limiting our ability to connect.  At the very least the paid accounts will save you time – best case – gets you in touch with a client / partner / employee that results in more business!  More here:  http://linkedintobusiness.com/2011/04/to-pay-or-not-to-pay-that-is-the-question…/

Q9: How do you get through the noise to make LinkedIn more valuable? It seems the groups etc. are just getting muddled.


Yes – I agree with you.

  • I have really restricted what comes into my email box on settings – and I really only “listen” to a few groups anymore.

  • I also use the advanced search whenever possible to weed out some noise – with signal, answers, etc

  • You can disconnect from the worst offenders


I REALLY wish LinkedIn would restrict the ability to post ALL tweets.  Sigh

Q10.  My company is very ROI oriented.  What do you recommend in terms of metrics and analytics?





  • Great questions - there's not much ROI on LinkedIn itself - although LinekdIn does have impression analytics in company pages and with the basic paid account there are some account impression analytics on the home page. 






  • Also Kout and even EmpireAvenue give some analytics - but really you might have to go with a paid service like Objective Marketer (Use code OMLIBPROMO for one month free trial)




Q11.  What are some of the best new applications integrating social media with other tools?



  • The LinkedIn Share button is nifty. They also have an "Apply with LinkedIn" button for job seekers.

  • A fab tool I recommend is Objectivemarketer.com

  • For more on LinkedIn tools you can visitwww.linkedinlabs.com


Q12. Would you share of few links or reference lists for "making the most of LinkedIn"?






Q13.  How often do recommending posting/ updating content on your linked in page?




  • I recommend once a day TOPS - hate it when people just blast their tweetstream into LinkedIn.

  • I play a lot within LinkedIn.com/signal - see what people are doing there and emulate what you think is successful



Q14.  What are the most important not to be missed sections that MUST be used in your personal LI page and also for a company page.



Here's a post on Best Practices on LinkedIn (including Profile) http://linkedintobusiness.com/linkedin-tips-tricks/
‎1. Treat your LinkedIn profile like a website:

Make sure it is formatted, clean, and free of spelling and grammatical errors. I strongly suggest creating your LinkedIn profile first in a word document – not only so you can “catch” errors, but also so you can get a better idea of what your profile will look like on the LinkedIn website. In some sections of LinkedIn you can also pull in bullets and special characters. Alas – still no bolding or italics other than what LinkedIn itself formats. Another bonus, if you’ve already created your profile in a Word document, sections of it can easily be copied into other social media platforms to keep your branding unified.

2. Know your keywords:

Like any website, LinkedIn’s internal search engines weigh your keywords heavily in its searches. Make sure you place your most important search or keywords strategically throughout your profile. Some places you might want to consider are your

  • Professional Headline

  • Title Fields

  • Specialties

  • Interests

  • Recommendations

  • Education (Activities and Societies)


3. Keep your name clean:

Put only your first name in the first name field and your last name in the last name field. If someone is searching for you by name, LinkedIn will have a hard time finding you if your last name looks like this: Smith, PhD. John A. ([email protected]) LION 941-555-1555

4. Keep your photo professional:

I recommend a close up and a smile. A full body shot of you and your family, you and your car, you and that fish you caught last week is unclear and unprofessional. I have seen some artists use artistic renderings of themselves – which is clever if your image is still clear. LinkedIn doesn’t like logos.

5. Don’t ignore the “post an update” function:

LinkedIn’s update function is much more robust than it used to be (taking some tips from Facebook and Twitter). People can now “like” and “comment” on your updates – which helps to build relationships within LinkedIn. And with the introduction of LinkedIn Signal, the update section can now be a functional part of your SME (Subject Matter Expertise) and content strategy. Make sure you take a little time each day to “like” and “comment” on the updates of network as well. (*Found on the home page.)

6. Personalize your public profile URL:

Make sure your public profile reflects your name, your business, or your area of expertise: http://linkedin.com/in/linkedinexpert
Nothing says, “I’m a LinkedIn neophyte” like a public profile that reads: http://linkedin.com/pub/firstname-lastname9890734-akjshfiho
7. Personalize your websites:

When you edit your website, the drop down menu gives you the option of “other”. When you click on that, a new field opens up that allows you to type in your business name, website name, call to action, or description of your website. So instead of “Company Website” or “Personal Website” this section can read “Social Media for Women” or “Click here: IP Legal Advice”

8. Juice up your “Experience” section:

“Experience” is not your resume. Make sure the jobs you choose to list support each other. Make sure you put all your keywords in the title section.

9. Utilize the “Experience” description area:

Use the 1000 characters in the description section to tell people why they should hire you or your company or buy your product. Tell a “save the day” story. Put in a testimonial. “Experience” is a great place to list “wins”, different companies you have helped, seminars or workshops you have presented, a mini-shot of your personal website. Use this section as the foundation for your Company Profile

10. List your “additional education”:

Make sure you list your certifications and licenses as well as traditional education. LinkedIn has now added new sections where you can list areas of expertise, publications, patents licenses and certifications.

11. Get Recommendations:

LinkedIn tells you your profile is complete at 3. I recommend at least ten recommendations. And when you are asking for recommendations, give a bulleted list of what you might want them to say so that your recommendation is more than: “She’s nice”. If you are comfortable doing so, you might write a recommendation that the recommender can use or base their recommendation from. You might want to add some of the better recommendations to your website. Ask for recommendations form thought leaders in your field, old employees, and well-known clients.

 

 
Viveka

About the Author: Viveka

Viveka is author of LinkedIn Marketing: An Hour a Day and is known internationally as the “LinkedIn Expert”.
CEO of Linked Into Business, she also hosts the biggest LinkedIn chat on Twitter.  Forbes has listed her as a top social media influencer for three years running, and she has been cited in Ragan, CNN, Forbes, Mashable, Simple Living, Bloomberg, LinkedIn's Small Business Site and "The Sophisticated Marketer's Guide to LinkedIn, The Miami Herald, Social Media Today and The Social Media Examiner!

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